Remembering how I got here — with a lot of help from others


About a month back, Basecamp put out a call for internship candidates. We’re looking for great people who want to learn about programming, product design, operations, data, or marketing directly from the people who work on Basecamp every day.

But before we went public with it, any interested team had to internally pitch a meaningful project and commit to investing the proper time and energy into teaching, guiding, and helping our interns regularly.

The Android team is made up of three people. And of those three, I was the loudest “no” vote. I think it was something along the lines of, “we don’t have time, it’s not a priority.”

I look back on that now and realize how insanely silly and selfish that was.

At every turn of my 15 year career, people have been helping me. Helping me to learn new skills, advance my career, or just to be a better person. I’ve tried to do the same for others over the years.

And yet when I was given such a clearcut opportunity to help someone else professionally, my first reaction was to punt it away because it wasn’t “a priority.”

At that moment, I had completely forgotten how I got to where I am today— with a lot of help from others. Sure, hard work, persistence, and maybe even some smarts helped pave the way. But I sure as hell didn’t build my career all by myself. I needed to remind myself of that. I needed to remember how I got here.


I have no idea what I’m doing

At my first job out of college, I was thrown onto Java projects. I had no idea what I was doing. For over two years, a bunch of people helped me as I fumbled my way through the basics of programming, business, and being a professional. These years laid the foundation of my career. Without the help, guidance, and friendship of a few key mentors, my career wouldn’t have turned out nearly as well as it did. I’m sure of that.

Truth.

By 2008 I’d been doing Java for a long while, and it was time for a change. I joined an interactive design agency in Chicago, converted to a project manager, and once again had no idea what I was doing. I was running multiple projects with dozens of people, in an industry I didn’t fully understand. I wasn’t doing any programming, but I sure was making a lot of clients angry.

And once again, so many people helped me through it. Veteran project managers taught me the tactics of project delivery, designers helped me understand the intricacies of their work, and account managers helped me handle, persuade, and sell to clients. By the time I’d left, I was a better balanced, more polished professional in all areas of my work, in large part because of the help of others.

Fast forward to today. I’ve been at Basecamp for almost three years, and have been a professional programmer, consultant, and project manager for over 15 years. And yet part of me still has no idea what I’m doing. I’m still getting help from others on a daily basis, from every part of the company. It doesn’t matter what I’m stuck on, there’s always a friendly teammate to help me with all the things that I don’t understand (which is a lot).


Paying it forward

Hopefully by now it’s crystal clear why I felt like such a fool for saying no to the internship idea. I honestly can’t imagine where I’d be today professionally if it wasn’t for for the selfless, generous help of others. But there’s a happy ending to this story.

About a day after I said no to the internship idea, I realized my madness and jumped on board with the idea. And not only did I vote yes, I wrote the formal pitch for our project and will be the point person for our awesome Android intern.

I know I didn’t say thank you enough to everyone who helped me so much along the way. I can only hope that paying it forward now and in the future serves as a small repayment of that debt.

So the next time you’re given the opportunity to help someone professionally, I’d encourage you to really stop and consider it. I know time is short and life is busy. But try to remember those people who helped pave the way for your successes — think of how proud they’ll be to know they’ve taught you well.


If you’re interested in one of our internship projects, applications close on 2/24/16, so you’ve got less than a week to apply. Get a move on!

We’re hard at work making the Basecamp 3 and its companion Android app the best it can be. Check ’em out!

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