Two new email reports in Basecamp

Until today there’s only been one way to stay caught up with all the activity on your Basecamp account, and one way to see what’s on your plate—both required you to log in to Basecamp and check yourself. Now you can have each automatically delivered to your email inbox.

Stay caught up with the daily activity email

Get a daily summary of all the activity across your account—even if you weren’t directly involved in it. Now you’ll get a daily email summarizing everything that happened since yesterday morning. If you’re working with clients, activity on the Clientside will be front and center with a special callout. After that you’ll get a rundown of all the new stuff that was added, and finally any discussions that took place.


Stay ahead with the weekly assignments email

If you’re like me and use assignments to keep you on track, you’ll enjoy starting each week with a full email report of what’s on your plate. Any assignments due this week or overdue — hey, it happens! — will be called out at the top for you.


Starting and stopping your email reports

Decided you don’t need these anymore? Just tap the link to “turn this email off” at the bottom of your email report or visit the Latest activity screen and the My assignments screen and click the orange button that says “Emailing me…”. Want it back on? Just click the “Email me…” button again.

Send me a daily email of what happened

Send me a weekly email of my assignments

We hope these new email reports make it easier to stay caught up, and stay ahead—all without even logging in. Happy Basecamping!

Basecamp 3 for Mac and Windows is here!

One of the best things about Basecamp is you can use it almost anywhere. All you need is a web browser and an internet connection. Laptop, phone, tablet, hotel lounge, school computer lab, Mom and Dad’s den — you know, the one with the CRT monitor… Anyway… Basecamp also is available in fully featured apps for iOS and Android that offer the additional power and convenience of native features on your phone or tablet.

Today, in that same spirit, we’re proud to announce Basecamp 3 for Windows and Mac.

Basecamp 3 for Mac (left) and Windows.

If you’re using Basecamp 3 daily on your computer we think you’ll find the app a big level-up from the browser experience. Here’s why:

It’s right at home

Once installed, Basecamp 3 has its own icon on your desktop, in the dock on your Mac, Windows taskbar, and when switching applications. Instead of being hidden in tab within your web browser, Basecamp is now front-and-center.

Basecamp 3 in the OS X dock (top) and Windows taskbar.

Notifications

Turn on notifications and you’ll see them right there on your computer as they happen. Even when you’re working in another application, a quick glance at the system tray icon or OS X menu bar will let you know when there is something new in Basecamp. Focus on work without missing a thing!

Basecamp Notifications on OS X (top) and Windows.

Available now

Basecamp 3 for Windows and Mac are free and available now. You can download them using the links below. For installation instructions view our help docs.

Download Basecamp 3 for Windows or Basecamp 3 for Mac.


Basecamp 3 works where you do on iOS, Android, Mac, Windows, and anywhere you’ve got a web browser and an internet connection. Your first Basecamp is completely free so try it today, it takes just a minute to sign-up.

First principles

In January of 2006, a young comedian with a taste of doing stand-up in college, moved to New York to make it big.

I got $200 and dreams, let’s do this thing.

But following a stretch of barely getting by and sleeping on the subway, he moved back to Chicago by May of the same year. So what happened to him? Did he give up?



Richard Feynman, one of the greatest physicists and thinkers of our time, was devoted to breaking things down into first principles. He’d strip a problem or idea down to the basics he first could prove to be true before building more on top.

For example, instead of studying theory and papers from other physicists to prepare to take his oral exam for his graduate degree, Richard opened up a blank notebook, titled it “Notebook Of Things I Don’t Know About”, and essentially wrote his own physics text book. Over the course of weeks, he built up his knowledge of physics from the very beginning of what he could prove to be true.

During the exam he was asked the color at the top of a rainbow. Instead of using the ROYGBIV acronym most of us learn in grade school, he used the refractive index of water, wavelengths, and physics to calculate the actual colors.

First principles is why I’m so interested in stand-up comedians, who are often solo acts, and survive on their own good ideas and delivery to make people laugh. They don’t have teams or venture capitalists doing things for them. They can’t make excuses that one of their co-founders blew up the business.

Our comedian had a recent interview where he shares several first principles that have helped him on his journey and we can learn a lot from them…


Generic problems

A lot of my standup is argument: Why are we doing this? Why do I have to do this? Why? Simple example: My buzzer rings yesterday. I go downstairs. UPS has a package. And he’s like “What’s the apartment?” “The one you were just ringing”

Peter F. Drucker wrote The Effective Executive in 1966 but much of it still rings true today. How do the best of us seem to get so much done? Well there are several things, like picking battles that matter and working from strengths. But one that stands out — working on generic problems.

Drucker: By far the most common mistake is to treat a generic situation as if it were a series of unique events; that is, to be pragmatic when one lacks the generic understanding and principle.The effective decision-maker, therefore, always assumes initially that the problem is generic. He always assumes that the event that clamors for his attention is in reality a symptom. He looks for the true problem. He is not content with doctoring the symptom alone.

This comedian is great at observing how even a UPS delivery driver presents a generic problem many of us face.

One of the first things I did at Highrise was to stop all the “favors” we were doing. Customers would come in and ask for unique things they needed handled in their account. Things that could only be done by a developer using our backend tools. It took up a ton of time, but even worse, it forced us to focus on symptoms.

When we instead focused on the problems they represented as generic issues many customers were going through, we were able to make big changes that made a lot of people happier. For example, “Company Tags” is a feature we just added because I refused to run a script for just a single account.

Of course it’s a balance. We still find ourselves doing one off favors, and in my opinion still too many. But we get a lot done at Highrise with a very small team, and this is a big reason: when a support case comes in, our first thought isn’t to delight this specific user at this specific moment, but to figure out if what we’re looking at could be generic and what we can do to stop it from happening in the future for more people. It’s hard to pull off, because we might actually disappoint a user at first, but the time we get back can be used to make a much larger impact for our customers.


Ask

On meeting Mitch Hedberg.

I got to do a show with him, actually, in 2005, a few weeks before he passed. He had a couple nights at Zanies in Chicago. I didn’t really have any social grace at that time. I was 22. I just asked him if I could get a guest spot. And he put me and a couple other comics on for five minutes in front of a sold-out crowd.

An opportunity he just had the guts to ask for. No reason Mitch would say yes, but what would hurt to ask?

Over and over again I see opportunities come my way just because I wasn’t afraid to ask. Our first deal at my first startup resulted from a cold email asking if someone would like to chat. I didn’t expect a reply. Instead, it turned into 35k in revenue, which made all the difference for us when we were making nothing.

Even what I’m doing today was because awhile ago I decided to take a shot and email Jason Fried of Basecamp to see if he’d like to chat about product development and share ideas about what I was working on. No reason I expected him to say yes. But he did. Over time that relationship turned into me taking over Highrise.

Didn’t know me from shit. And I killed it.

Sometimes you just take a bunch of shots and see what happens.


Perspective

Daniel T. Gilbert, a psychologist at Harvard, published an article in 2013 about the “end of history illusion”. They found significant evidence that humans are really bad at predicting our own change. Sure, when we look back a decade we see how much we’ve grown and learned, but when we try to predict how we’ll change over the course of the next decade, most people think they’ll change very little. Our tastes, ideas, hobbies, etc. will just remain the same. Then, give us another decade, and we’ll look back, and again we’ll see how naive we were.

That’s a ripe place to make mistakes. The feeling of not changing makes us resistant to looking for help and new ideas.

We launched a brand new marketing site for Highrise in November of 2014. Of course, I wanted to test the new site to make sure it converted new customers as well or hopefully better than the old site.

And believe me, I know split testing.

I’ve been split testing sites for decades. I know all the tools available. I’ve even written a split testing utility for Ruby.

So as we rolled out the new site, we first tested. And as soon as we saw a statistically significant increase in signups, we deployed the new site to all our traffic. And on we went.

Now, in a new year, we started reviewing how Highrise is doing compared to Highrise of the past, and even more, how does it compare to Basecamp?

This time, to get some help with looking at historical data I reached out to Noah, the data scientist at Basecamp, who sent over a thorough analysis.

Active users — up. Retention of trial customers — up. Yearly retention of users — up.

Awesome. But…

“Nate, the revenue mix is totally off.”

We had increased free signups, but decreased paid signups. The new marketing site has a greater conversion rate but only because we included free signups in our test metric. Overall, we lost a bunch of potential paid customers because of our changes.

Uggh.

The subsequent fix to our marketing site took under 3 hours. Now our plans page looks a lot like the original site again. And it increased our revenue by 63%.

How did I not see this? Hubris. I should have brought in Noah from the get go. I did a poor job of predicting how much I still needed to learn and change in this new role and business.

Our comedian shares in a recent interview with NPR regarding his time sleeping on the subway:

“It was just really goofy on my part,” he admits, in retrospect. “ ’Cause I didn’t have to do that. I could have — one, I could have made up with my sister and apologized for popping in on her place like that. But I was too cocky. And two, I could have just gone back home to Chicago. So it was just goofiness on my part. I don’t glamorize it, like, ‘Oh, I was living on the train for my dream. It wasn’t; I don’t look at it like that at all.”

Now he realizes how easily he could have fixed his situation early in his career. If only he knew then what he knows now. How cocky he was. How easily he could have asked for forgiveness or more help. If only we could predict how little we know 🙂

But maybe just knowing Gilbert’s research is enough. Maybe if we just assume we really never know enough, we’ll make some better decisions.


When I see a comic make headway in the world, like Louis C.K or Mitch Hedberg, they get my attention. Of course because they’re funny. But how do they do it? How do they stay relevant and find new good ideas? How do they market themselves?

Hannibal Buress is a great example. He was that young cocky kid at 23 who moved to New York only to end up sleeping on the subway and moving back home. Today though we can find Hannibal on comedy specials, TV, touring the world, and we can learn a lot from his recent interviews with Scott Raab in Esquire and NPR’s David Greene.

If we understand what’s worked for Hannibal as he struggled to create a life and business in his craft — like looking for generic problems, asking for help, and realizing how little we know — perhaps we can use those as first principles in our own lives, teams and organizations.


P.S. It would be awesome to meet you on Twitter, or see the awesome new stuff we’re doing at Highrise.

New: Better control over email and phone notifications in Basecamp 3

Before today, it was hard to know if Basecamp would tell you about new messages via email or through the app on your phone. Now Basecamp has clearer settings that give you control over how and when you receive new messages from other people on your Basecamps.

The new email notifications setting

Now you can check a box to tell Basecamp if you want emails or not. Want emails? Check it on. Don’t want emails? Check it off. It’s as simple as that.

In the past, Basecamp didn’t send you emails if you had the app installed on a phone or tablet. Now your phone and tablet settings are entirely separate from the email settings. You control if you want emails and phone notifications, just one of them, or neither.

The new notification settings

New option: Receive everything or just Pings and @mentions

Sometimes you don’t want to know about everything on a Basecamp account. You may just want to be notified when people mention you by name or send you a private message. Now we have a setting that allows you to block all notifications except for Pings and @mentions.

New setting to get everything or just Pings and @mentions.

Work Can Wait

All of these settings filter through Basecamp 3’s much-loved Work Can Wait feature. Use Work Can Wait to tell Basecamp to “hold your calls” outside of working hours. All notifications will be silenced until it’s work time again so you can enjoy your free time without interruptions.

Work Can Wait

To access the improved settings screen, click your avatar in the upper-right corner and click Change notification settings.


More details are available on the Notifications help page.

Thanks for using Basecamp 3! We hope these new settings make it easier for you to get notifications from Basecamp in the right way at the right time.

Practical skills that practical data scientists need

When I wrote about how I mostly just use arithmetic, a lot of people asked me about what skills or tools a data scientist needs if not fancy algorithms. What is this mythical “basic math” that I mentioned? Here’s my take on what skills are actually needed for the sort of work that I do at Basecamp: simple analyses focused on solving actual business problems.

The most important skill: being able to understand the business and the problem

I’ll get to actual practical skills that you can learn in a textbook in a minute, but first I have to belabor one point: the real essential skill of a data scientist is the ability to understand the business and the problem, and the intellectual curiosity to want to do so. What are you actually trying to achieve as a business? Who are your customers? When are you selling your product? What are the underlying economics of the business? Are profit margins high or modest? Do you have many small customers or a few large customers? How wide is your product range? Who are you competing with? What challenge is the business facing that you’re trying to solve or provide input towards a decision on? What’s the believable range of answers? Who is involved in solving this problem? Can analysis actually make a difference? How much time is worth investing in this problem?

Understanding the data

Before you look at any data or do any math, a data scientist needs to understand the underlying data sources, structure, and meaning. Even if someone else goes out and gets the data from wherever it’s stored and gives it to you, you still need to understand the origin and what each part of the data means. Data quality varies dramatically across and within organizations; in some cases you’ll have a well documented data dictionary, and in other cases you’ll have nothing. Regardless, you’ll want to be able to answer the following questions:

  • What data do I need to solve the problem?
  • Where is that data located? In a relational database? In a log file on disk? In a third party service?
  • How comprehensive (time and scope) is the data? Are there gaps in coverage or retention?
  • What does each field in the data mean in terms of actual behavior of humans or computers?
  • How accurate is each field in the data? Does it come from something that’s directly observed, self-reported, third-party sourced, or imputed?
  • How can I use this data in a way that minimizes the risk of violating someone’s privacy?

SQL skills

For better or worse, most of the data that data scientists need live in relational databases that quack SQL, whether that’s MySQL, Postgres, Hive, Impala, Redshift, BigQuery, Teradata, Oracle, or something else. Your mission is to free the data from the confines of that relational database without crashing the database instance, pulling more or less data than you need to, getting inaccurate data, or waiting a year for a query to finish.

Virtually every query a data scientist writes to get data to analyze to solve business problems will be a SELECT statement. The essential SQL concepts and functions that I find necessary are:

  • DESCRIBE and EXPLAIN
  • WHERE clauses, including IN (…)
  • GROUP BY
  • Joins, mostly left and inner
  • Using already indexed fields
  • LIMIT and OFFSET
  • LIKE and REGEXP
  • if()
  • String manipulation, primarily left() and lower()
  • Date manipulation: date_add, datediff, to and from UNIX timestamps, time component extraction
  • regexp_extract (if you’re lucky to use a database that supports it) or substring_index (if you’re less lucky)
  • Subqueries

Basic math skills

Once you have some data, you can do some maths. The list of what I consider to be the essential list of math skills and concepts is not a long one:

  • Arithmetic (addition, subtraction, multiplication, division)
  • Percentages (of total, difference vs. another value)
  • Mean and median (and mean vs. median)
  • Percentiles
  • Histograms and cumulative distribution functions
  • An understanding of probability, randomness, and sampling
  • Growth rates (simple and compound)
  • Power analysis (for proportions and means)
  • Significance testing (for proportions and means)

This isn’t a very complicated set of things. It’s not about the math, it’s about the problem you’re solving.

Slightly more advanced math concepts

On occasion, some more advanced mathematical or SQL concepts or skills are of value to common business problems. A handful of the more common things I use include:

  • Analytic functions if supported by your database (lead(), lag(), rank(), etc.)
  • Present and future value and discount rates
  • Survival analysis
  • Linear and logistic regression
  • Bag of Words textual representations

There are some problems that require more advanced techniques, and I don’t mean to disparage or dismiss those. If your business can truly benefit from things like deep learning, congratulations! That probably means you’ve solved all the easy problems that your business is facing.

Remembering how I got here — with a lot of help from others


About a month back, Basecamp put out a call for internship candidates. We’re looking for great people who want to learn about programming, product design, operations, data, or marketing directly from the people who work on Basecamp every day.

But before we went public with it, any interested team had to internally pitch a meaningful project and commit to investing the proper time and energy into teaching, guiding, and helping our interns regularly.

The Android team is made up of three people. And of those three, I was the loudest “no” vote. I think it was something along the lines of, “we don’t have time, it’s not a priority.”

I look back on that now and realize how insanely silly and selfish that was.

At every turn of my 15 year career, people have been helping me. Helping me to learn new skills, advance my career, or just to be a better person. I’ve tried to do the same for others over the years.

And yet when I was given such a clearcut opportunity to help someone else professionally, my first reaction was to punt it away because it wasn’t “a priority.”

At that moment, I had completely forgotten how I got to where I am today— with a lot of help from others. Sure, hard work, persistence, and maybe even some smarts helped pave the way. But I sure as hell didn’t build my career all by myself. I needed to remind myself of that. I needed to remember how I got here.


I have no idea what I’m doing

At my first job out of college, I was thrown onto Java projects. I had no idea what I was doing. For over two years, a bunch of people helped me as I fumbled my way through the basics of programming, business, and being a professional. These years laid the foundation of my career. Without the help, guidance, and friendship of a few key mentors, my career wouldn’t have turned out nearly as well as it did. I’m sure of that.

Truth.

By 2008 I’d been doing Java for a long while, and it was time for a change. I joined an interactive design agency in Chicago, converted to a project manager, and once again had no idea what I was doing. I was running multiple projects with dozens of people, in an industry I didn’t fully understand. I wasn’t doing any programming, but I sure was making a lot of clients angry.

And once again, so many people helped me through it. Veteran project managers taught me the tactics of project delivery, designers helped me understand the intricacies of their work, and account managers helped me handle, persuade, and sell to clients. By the time I’d left, I was a better balanced, more polished professional in all areas of my work, in large part because of the help of others.

Fast forward to today. I’ve been at Basecamp for almost three years, and have been a professional programmer, consultant, and project manager for over 15 years. And yet part of me still has no idea what I’m doing. I’m still getting help from others on a daily basis, from every part of the company. It doesn’t matter what I’m stuck on, there’s always a friendly teammate to help me with all the things that I don’t understand (which is a lot).


Paying it forward

Hopefully by now it’s crystal clear why I felt like such a fool for saying no to the internship idea. I honestly can’t imagine where I’d be today professionally if it wasn’t for for the selfless, generous help of others. But there’s a happy ending to this story.

About a day after I said no to the internship idea, I realized my madness and jumped on board with the idea. And not only did I vote yes, I wrote the formal pitch for our project and will be the point person for our awesome Android intern.

I know I didn’t say thank you enough to everyone who helped me so much along the way. I can only hope that paying it forward now and in the future serves as a small repayment of that debt.

So the next time you’re given the opportunity to help someone professionally, I’d encourage you to really stop and consider it. I know time is short and life is busy. But try to remember those people who helped pave the way for your successes — think of how proud they’ll be to know they’ve taught you well.


If you’re interested in one of our internship projects, applications close on 2/24/16, so you’ve got less than a week to apply. Get a move on!

We’re hard at work making the Basecamp 3 and its companion Android app the best it can be. Check ’em out!

Data scientists mostly just do arithmetic and that’s a good thing

Hi, I’m Noah. I work at Basecamp. Sometimes I’m called a “data scientist.” Mostly, I just do arithmetic, and I’m ok with that.

Here’s a few of the things I worked on in the last couple of weeks, each of them in response to a real problem facing the business:

  • I analyzed conversion, trial completion, and average invoice amounts for users in different countries.
  • I identified the rate at which people accidentally sign up for Basecamp when they mean to sign in to an existing account and how that’s changed over time.
  • I analyzed and reported on financial performance of a few of our products.
  • I ran and analyzed a survey of account owners.
  • I analyzed an A/B test we ran that affected the behavior of a feature within Basecamp.

In the last two weeks, the most “sophisticated” math I’ve done has been a few power analyses and significance tests. Mostly what I’ve done is write SQL queries to get data, performed basic arithmetic on that data (computing differences, percentiles, etc.), graphed the results, and wrote paragraphs of explanation or recommendation.

I haven’t coded up any algorithms, built any recommendation engines, deployed a deep learning system, or built a neural net.

Why not? Because Basecamp doesn’t need those things right now.

The dirty little secret of the ongoing “data science” boom is that most of what people talk about as being data science isn’t what businesses actually need. Businesses need accurate and actionable information to help them make decisions about how they spend their time and resources. There is a very small subset of business problems that are best solved by machine learning; most of them just need good data and an understanding of what it means that is best gained using simple methods.

Some people will argue that what I’ve described as being valuable isn’t “data science”, but is instead just “business intelligence” or “data analytics”. I can’t argue with that arbitrary definition of data science, but it doesn’t matter what you call it — it’s still the most valuable way for most people who work with data to spend their time.

I get a fair number of emails from people who want to get into “data science” asking for advice. Should they get a masters degree? Should they do a bunch of Kaggle competitions?

My advice is simple: no. What you should probably do is make sure you understand how to do basic math, know how to write a basic SQL query, and understand how a business works and what it needs to succeed. If you want to be a valuable contributor to a business, instead of spending your weekend working on a data mining competition, go work in a small business. Talk to customers. Watch what products sell and which ones don’t. Think about the economics that drive the business and how you can help it succeed more.

Knowing what matters is the real key to being an effective data scientist.

Bootstrapped and Proud

Illustration by Nate Otto

I first learned about boot jacks a couple weeks ago, when I reported this story about Alcala’s Western Wear, a 41-year-old retailer in Chicago. Illinois is not a place where you see a lot of cowboy boots — not like, say, Texas or Montana, where airport security checkpoints come with boot jacks to help flyers take off their boots.

Yet even in this urban metropolis, Alcala’s Western Wear has flourished, offering a massive selection of cowboy hats, boots, shirts, belt buckles and more. Western wear has been far more than a fashion fad for the Alcala family, now in its second generation of ownership. The Alcalas know what it’s like to bootstrap a business in every sense of the word.

Transcript

WAILIN: Richard Alcala has been selling clothing for a long time, long enough that you can track his career by the width of men’s pants. When Richard was starting out, bell bottoms were all the rage, thanks to Saturday Night Fever.

RICHARD: They were really tight in the thigh and they were really wide as soon as it got to the knee. From the knee down, they were like a big, big V. And they covered — they were so wide that they covered your shoes. Everybody wanted to be like that guy in the movie.

WAILIN: That guy, of course, being John Travolta. Saturday Night Fever came out in 1977. And men’s pants have gotten a lot slimmer since then, surprising even Richard, who’s been in the retail business for more than four decades.

RICHARD: Guys’ skinny jeans. I never saw that coming. And it’s still coming strong, my gosh. I don’t think those tapered jeans are going anywhere. I think people really really love them and they love the way they fit.

WAILIN: Richard’s business isn’t going anywhere either. He’s the president of Alcala’s Western Wear, a Chicago store that sells cowboy hats, boots, shirts, belt buckles, and more. Here, east of the Mississippi River, you’ll find more apartment dwellers with cats and dogs than grizzled ranchers with cows and horses. And yet Alcala’s Western Wear has endured, outlasting disco and many other fashion fads. You’ll hear the story of this urban cowboy outfitter on The Distance, a podcast about long-running businesses. I’m Wailin Wong. The Distance is a production of Basecamp. Introducing the new Basecamp Three. Basecamp is everything any team needs to stay on the same page about whatever they’re working on. Tasks, spur of the moment conversations with coworkers, status updates, reports, documents and files all share one home. And now your first basecamp is completely free forever. Sign up at basecamp.com/thedistance.

RICHARD: I’m wearing some brown alligator boots by Old Gringo and I’m wearing a Stetson hat and it’s a white color because good guys wear white, supposedly, from the movies, okay, and I’m wearing a bolo tie. It’s made out of stone. And this is how I dress every day. You know, it’s who I am.

WAILIN: Richard Alcala is the fifth of ten children who were born into a family of salesmen. His great-grandfather sold cars at one of Ford’s first dealerships in Mexico, and he was also the first taxi cab driver in the city of Durango.

RICHARD: He had the first license for a taxi and he would go up and down the boulevard giving people rides. And my father said there were so many people they would stand on the outside of the car on the running boards and just hold on because they couldn’t fit into this car because they could only fit so many people in this car, right? And he loved selling cars. My great-grandfather loved selling cars, and so I think it’s just in our blood.

WAILIN: Richard’s father, Luis, came to the US and landed in Chicago, where among other jobs, he had a table at the Maxwell Street market. This was an open-air bazaar on the city’s near west side that was known as a bargain hunters’ paradise for over a hundred years, until the mid nineties. It was where Richard learned how to make a sale from watching his father.

RICHARD: He would go to Maxwell Street every Sunday and set up his own little booth there on the street and he would sell things. He would sell clothing. He did brooms. He sold lawn mowers. Basically whatever he could get, he would sell. And since we had a large family, you know, the sons would go with him and help.

We weren’t allowed to keep our hands in our pockets. That was a big no-no. Never put your hands in your pocket because you’re telling the customer that you really don’t care. So you could never put—even if it was below zero, you could not put your hands in your pocket.

It was neat to sell something. That was like the pat on the back. When you sold something, you felt like, “Wow, I did this. I did this and I did this on my own.”

WAILIN: Luis Alcala eventually opened a brick and mortar store on the south side of Chicago, selling men’s clothing. Many of his customers worked at a nearby US Steel plant, and business declined when that factory closed. So he opened a second menswear store in 1975, this time further north, in a neighborhood populated with Polish, Mexican and Puerto Rican residents. Five years later, another John Travolta movie — Urban Cowboy — sparked interest in western wear.

RICHARD: They wanted to wear his hat. They wanted the same shirt that he wore in the movie. All of a sudden, every guy in Chicago wanted a big pickup truck. Now, was it practical to have a pickup truck in Chicago? Probably not. Did anybody care? No. Nobody cared that they didn’t need a pickup truck, but they wanted a pickup truck because that’s what he drove in this movie and they wanted the hat that he wore and it really really brought western wear, like—it made the whole industry, like, really really popular.

WAILIN: At Alcala’s, customers were coming in asking for shirts with snaps, and boots, and hats. Richard, who had worked at the store since the eighth grade, thought the family business could distinguish itself from other menswear stores in the neighborhood by focusing on western wear. But his father took some convincing.

RICHARD: He wasn’t very fond of the idea because we had been carrying menswear for a long time, and to all of a sudden stop carrying it and switching over to something new was like a real big change. It was a real big change but I told him, I says, “Dad, we have to do this. We can’t be — we can’t be both. You know, we can’t be western wear and we can’t be menswear. We have to be one or the other because we don’t want to confuse customers.”

WAILIN: Not only did Alcala’s make the switch, but it grew into an enormous one-stop shop for everything western, and expanded to women and children’s apparel. The store is 10,000 square feet and carries 8,000 pairs of boots, 3,000 pairs of jeans, three thousand shirts and 4,000 hats. There’s also belt buckles, bootstraps, leather duster jackets, bolo ties, blankets and jewelry.

RICHARD: We’ve always believed that the customers should get a good selection. Customers don’t want to come in and look at a shirt and have ten shirts to decide from. I think it’s better if they can look at 200 shirts and decide from 200 which ones they like.

WAILIN: Alcala’s prides itself on its large inventory and customer service. There’s a tailor on staff who will alter jeans and shirts for free, usually while you wait. There’s also a specialist in the hat department.

ENRIQUE,: Hi, my name is Enrique Mendoza and I’m working at Alcala’s, shaping and cleaning hats for a very very long time.

WAILIN: How long? Since 1988, when Enrique came to the US from Mexico. His brother-in-law worked at Alcala’s as a tailor and got him a job in the hat department, where he’s been ever since. If you want the brim on your Stetson to frame your face just so, Enrique’s your man. He uses a foot-operated steamer and his hand to mold hats into the right shape. Enrique estimates he works on 200 hats a week. Sometimes it’s a quick spot clean, other times it’s trimming a brim and shaping the crown. You can get the cattleman crease, which has three creases, or the pinch front crease, which creates a triangular shape, or the telescope, which is a circular crown with a crease that goes all the way around. There are a lot of choices — straw, felt, leather, different colors and band styles and brim sizes — and Enrique has 27 years of experience helping customers make sense of it all.

ENRIQUE: I’m asking, “Okay, where are you going?” If you going to a wedding, you need a nice and elegant hat, right? If you go to a rodeo on an open field, you need a different hat, so it depends on where you going, is the hat you have to buy.

WAILIN: Enrique’s secret weapon is a spray bottle of Windex. He discovered by accident many years ago that it’s a good cleaner for hats and dries faster than water.

ENRIQUE: You gotta do the brush, you see? The clock go this way; you have to do the other way. That’s the way that finish the hat, look.

(Sound of brushing)

And the Windex, it helps you clean it, look. See?

(Sound of brushing)

WAILIN: The kind of personal attention that Enrique and other staff members provide is more important than ever, now that Alcala’s is facing so much competition — both from online-only retailers and its own suppliers like Levi’s, who have started selling directly to consumers. The store sells merchandise online, but Richard thinks of the website as more of a big, Google-friendly business card than a source of revenue.

RICHARD: I don’t understand how people can buy boots and shirts and jeans online without trying them on. I guess you gotta order them and return them if they don’t fit, and do it all over again, you know, I think it’s easier if you just come to a store and try them on.

WAILIN: And if you come to Alcala’s in person, you can try on merchandise while your kids ride one of the store’s two mechanical ponies. You can feel the difference between rattlesnake and eel skin and stingray boots, or ask Enrique Mendoza how your hat should look.

RICHARD: If we close our store tomorrow and we depended online business, we would be closed in 30 days. There’s so much competition out there. There’s so many non stores. There’s so many people out there selling the same product that we do who don’t have a store. They have a garage. They’re working out of their basement. They don’t have 30 employees. We have 30 employees here.

WAILIN: A lot of those employees are family members. Remember when I told you Richard is the fifth of ten kids? Five of his siblings work at the store too, along with other relatives.

RICHARD: My brother Robert, he’s the accounting. I have a sister, Lupi, she’s accounts payable. I have a brother John who is in charge of shipping and receiving. And I have another brother Louie, who’s a cashier. My wife Elia, she’s a cashier. And then we have nieces and nephews working here and I’ve got a brother-in-law working here, so there’s a lot of family members working here.

Everybody has their own responsibility. You don’t have two or three people doing the same job, so I think it’s important that everybody kind of like has their own position. They have their own responsibilities, and I think that really helps when you’re in a family business. So this way, not everybody’s meddling into everybody else’s job.

WAILIN: Richard’s job is president, a position he’s had since 1982, when his father picked him as his successor after a year of observing him and his siblings.

RICHARD: Since I was number five out of ten, I thought I would never be able to run this company because I have four brothers who are older than me. And so one day, my dad had a family meeting and he called us over and he says, “I want someone to run this company. One of you’s are going to run this company and I’m not gonna base it on age.” And I was like, “Yes, that’s great, I’m so happy, wow. So now I have a chance.” And so I really really worked hard and I proved to my father that I wanna be the one who runs this company. He picked me and he told my brothers — he told my older brothers, he said, “Look, even though he’s younger than you, you have to respect his decisions. You can’t look at him like he’s your little brother and now your little brother is bossing you around.” He said, “Everybody had the same opportunity that he did, but none of you’s showed the same interest that he did. So now this is how it’s gonna be. Your brother’s going to be in charge and if he says go right, we’re gonna have to go right.”

WAILIN: Richard’s father, Luis, passed away in 2014 at the age of 92. Portraits of Luis Alcala and his wife of more than 60 years, Carmen, hang side by side at the front of the store. Hand-lettered signs above each painting say “El Rey” — the king — and “La Reina” — the queen. In Luis’ portrait, he’s wearing tinted aviator glasses and looks every bit the patriarch, watching over the business he founded. Richard is 57 and starting to think about stepping back in a few years. He plans to search for a successor the same way his father did, by finding someone who really loves the business and will take care of it, someone who’s a natural salesperson.

RICHARD: I’m a real firm believer that you have to wear what you sell. I would feel ridiculous if I’m helping a customer, showing him cowboy boots, and I’m wearing gym shoes. It’s important that you wear what you sell and that you love what you sell. You have to believe in it.

WAILIN: Over four decades in the business, Richard’s tastes have evolved a bit. But he’s still very much a believer in the appeal of a sharp-looking pair of boots and a hat — in white, of course, because he’s one of the good guys.

RICHARD: I used to wear, like, real loud fancy shirts with a lot of embroidery in them, and I’ve noticed that I really don’t anymore. So yeah, you know, your tastebuds kind of change. Your tastebuds kind of change over the years, but you know, I still love what I’m doing and it’s been 43 years and I’m still here.

WAILIN: The Distance is produced by Shaun Hildner and me, Wailin Wong. Our illustrations are done by Nate Otto. We’ll be back next week with a mini episode where Shaun shops for a pair of cowboy boots at Alcala’s, so stay tuned for that. In the meantime, if you could leave us a review on iTunes, we would be so grateful. It helps our show gets discovered by new listeners. The Distance is a production of Basecamp, the leading app for keeping teams on the same page about whatever they’re working on. Your first Basecamp is completely free forever. Try the brand new Basecamp Three for yourself at basecamp.com/thedistance.

Make losses affordable

People do crazy things when they can’t afford to lose. Being dealt a bad hand, which invariably happens at some point, becomes an existential threat, the brain shuts off rational analysis, the primal mode of survival kicks in. It’s when morals and spines are broken.

Let’s say your business is reliant on just a few big customers. Now any one of them has the power to make you sweat, or worse, by threatening to pull the plug. If you absolutely need their business, you will absolutely do what they say — even when it’s the wrong answer or direction to the overall mission. When your business has been over-tuned for these few edge cases, your dependency deepens, leaving you less open to new customers (and profits).

This is why acting on customers’ requests, rather than on their behalf, is generally a bad idea. Customers know what’s right for them, in singular. It’s your job to listen but then act on the aggregate sense of what most customers would want most of the time. That’s very hard to do if you can’t afford to say no to a single customer.

The same is true with vendors. If you’re relying on a service so much that they can dictate your existence, well, then they can dictate your existence! That’s the recurrent threat and theme of building on other people’s platforms. Or relying on a particular algorithm for search results in, say, Google. Companies make choices based on what’s right for them, not what’s right for you.

Finally, the hardest part is when this is true of employees. If your magic wizard of server mountain is a complete asshole, but only they hold the knowledge of how to keep your business in the air, whatcha gonna do? You’re going to eat their bullshit, that’s what. And that bullshit is going to seep through the whole organization until it has stained it completely.

The easiest way to get yourself out of a bad situation is to avoid it in the first place. Harder said than done, but not impossible if you maintain a healthy dose of skepticism when Golden Opportunities present themselves.

Like when that big prospective client is dangling a huge check that could grow your business by 20%, but the alarm bells are already ringing red on their list of “requests” to make that happen. Is growing by 20% in one jump worth it if it’s off the ledge?

When the vendor offers you a too-good-to-be-true deal if you’d just climb inside their fortress with towering barriers of exit, well, then maybe the power of that social graph should get another thought.

Or when that impressive candidate who’s willing to take a below-market salary radiates contempt for anyone beneath their ninja chops. Is having one superhero on the team worth a toxic environment for everyone else?

Don’t make any of your dependencies too big to fail. Whatever advantage you gain in the short term by saying yes is dread and misery later when you can’t say no.


We designed Basecamp from the beginning to capable of taking individual losses. Most customers only pay us around $50/month. We built an audience and technology base that wasn’t beholden to any existing corporate platform or vendor. Those choices are part of the reason we’re still around after 12 years.

To the Android open source community: Thank you!


While developing the Basecamp 3 Android app over the past year, we’ve leaned quite a bit on some really useful open source libraries.

These libraries did a bunch of heavy lifting for us. They helped shorten our development time, increase programmer happiness (since we didn’t have to write them from scratch!) and ultimately ship a better product.

Open source is such a deep-rooted part of Basecamp’s culture that I think it’s important to give credit where credit is due. I want to, in some small way, show our gratitude to a group of people who probably aren’t thanked all that often.

So, to all of you — the women and men who author and maintain Android open source projects everywhere — thank you very, very much for all your hard work!


The All-Stars

There are lots and lots of libraries out there, so I’d be remiss if I didn’t call out some all-stars that really helped us out.

Big thanks to the teams that build and maintain these libraries — you’ve made our work and lives better! (If you’re an Android programmer, it’d be a good idea to bookmark these if you’re not already using them.)

  • Facebook’s Stetho: A debug bridge that lets you use Chrome Developer Tools to inspect native UI, resources, and data. We use this quite a bit to debug layout issues and stored preference data.
  • Flipboard’s BottomSheet: An easy way to mimic Android’s bottom sheet interaction without writing it from scratch. We use this to power our share sheet, and have some ideas about future uses too.
  • Google’s GSON: Easily serializes JSON into Java objects. We use GSON a lot to serialize JSON data, which makes it a breeze to work with in Java.
  • greenrobot’s EventBus: An event bus that makes it super easy to implement a pub-sub model. We use events for all sorts of stuff, like updating the UI when a background data call finishes.
  • Path’s Android Priority Job Queue: A job manager that has simple defaults, but offers a lot of power too. It’s fantastic for running asynchronous jobs and a wonderful replacement for the dreaded Asynctask.
  • Square’s Retrofit and OkHttp: If you’re doing any kind of API or HTTP work, you need to use these, period. We use Retrofit exclusively for all of our API interfaces.

Giving Back — Turbolinks Android

Like any good citizen of an active developer community, we’re not just going to leech — we’re ready to give back!

In short order we’ll be releasing our first open source Android library — Turbolinks Android. It’s the same adapter framework that’s powered our Basecamp 3 Android app since November 2015, and it’s a crucial component in our native-web hybrid approach. It’s made specifically for Android, and will get your hybrid app hooked up to a Turbolinks 5 web app in a jiffy.

We’ve done our very best to make sure Turbolinks Android possesses all the qualities that we love about the all-stars libraries above: easy to get started, easy to use, fast, and reliable.

We’re thankful that we’ve been able to stand on the shoulders of awesome libraries ourselves, and can’t wait to get Turbolinks Android out to the open source community!


If you’re an Android open source developer and ever want to chat, feel free to contact myself or Jay. We’d love to talk and share ideas!

We’re hard at work making the Basecamp 3 and its companion Android app the best it can be. Check ’em out!