What’s New in Basecamp 3.9.3 for iOS

The newest release introduces a brand new tab along with improvements to searching, navigation, and for people who have multiple accounts. Get it for iPhone and iPad in the App Store today. Read-on for details about what’s new…

New Me tab!

We know that My Assignments is one of the most popular screens in Basecamp on all platforms but it can be hard to find. Now My Assignments and the rest of My Stuff are easier to reach on the new Me tab. It also includes your Bookmarks and app Settings.

Introducing the brand new Me tab, a place to find all your stuff and settings.

New Activity view switcher

Gone is the old Activity | Reports toggle. Basecamp now has a nice switcher to change between activity views more akin to web and mobile web. It’s easier to see what you’re currently looking at and you now stay on the same screen rather than navigating forward.

Tap the switcher at the top to choose a different activity view.

Before you search…

Looking for something in Basecamp? Pop on over to Find to see your Recently Visited places and Recent Searches, too. We hope that with this change, Basecamp helps surface what you might be looking for before you search.

Pick something recent (left) or search everywhere (right).

Better support for multiple accounts

If you have multiple Basecamp accounts, this one is for you. Now the name of the current account is prominently displayed at the top of Home and Hey. Tap it to switch to a different account.

Tap the account name to switch to another account (left). Pull-down slightly to reveal the project filter and view toggle.

Opening links

This is a small change but now when you tap an external link in Basecamp it’ll open with a Safari view right inside Basecamp rather than opening the Safari app. You may have seen this in Twitter and other popular apps already. Now it’s so much easier to get back to where you were in Basecamp when you’re done reading.

External links now open inside Basecamp with a SafariViewController.

Thanks for using Basecamp!

As always, please keep suggestions, feedback, and bug reports coming our way. If you’re interesting in seeing new features before everyone else, we have a few openings left in our private beta. Send us an email and we’ll get you invited.

❤️📱 The iOS Team at Basecamp, 
Tara Mann, Dylan Ginsburg, Zach Waugh, and me.

New in Basecamp: See where projects really stand with the Hill Chart

For years we’ve used Basecamp To-Dos to track all of our design and programming work here at Basecamp. They help us make sure that nothing slips through the cracks.

However, for some projects, tracking to-dos isn’t enough. When you have dozens or hundreds of tasks, you need a way to see the bigger picture. Is the project going to be done on time? Are we making progress on the right tasks? Which things need to be solved now and what can be deferred until later?

To solve this problem, we built an entirely new idea into Basecamp To-Dos. It’s a 10,000-foot view of our projects that answers the hard questions about where things really stand.

Introducing the Hill Chart.


Progress is not a number

“42% of the tasks are complete.” What does that tell you? Very little.

For creative work and software projects, you can’t describe progress with a number. Why not? Because tasks on a project aren’t all the same. If the team gets stuck or starts to run out of time, it matters which tasks are in that 42%. The strategy for getting unstuck depends on where you’re stuck.


More than that, we don’t actually know every task in advance. As we roll up our sleeves on a project, we discover more detailed tasks to track than we had in the beginning. A raw percentage count would show our progress going backward instead of forwards when that happens!

What we really want to know is where the work stands. Has the team figured out how to do it? Are there unknowns that will block us ahead? What’s solved and what’s still full of uncertainty?

Work is like a hill

We found a metaphor for talking about this at Basecamp. Every piece of work has two phases. First there’s an uphill phase where you figure out your approach. You have a basic idea about the task, but you haven’t figured out what the solution is going to look like or how to solve all the unknowns.

Then after you’ve explored what works and what doesn’t, you reach a point where there aren’t any unsolved problems anymore. That’s like standing at the top of the hill. You can see clearly all the way down the other side. Then the downhill phase is just about execution.


Work on the two sides of the hill is very different.

Uphill work is hard to estimate. You might go in circles searching for the right approach. And as long as unknowns remain, there’s risk. The programmer thinks it’ll be a quick change but the API is different than expected. Or the interaction design seemed like a quick fix but there’s no room for the button on the mobile version.

On the downhill side, the world is certain. You’ve solved the problems, figured out your approach, eliminated the unknowns. All that remains are steps of execution to finish the project.

A human data point

No calculation will tell you how many unknowns are on a to-do list. Or how hard the remaining problems are. That’s why we built a way for teams to communicate, in a human way, exactly how they feel about where the work stands from unknown to known using the metaphor of the hill.

Here’s a demo to show you how it works.

A Hill Chart from a real project

Each of our development projects in Basecamp is made of a set of To-Do Lists. We create a To-Do List for each piece of work that we can make progress on independently.


Now to track progress, we turn on Hill Chart tracking for each list. This will reveal a Hill Chart on the top of the To-Dos screen with a dot for the list we’re tracking.


We did this for three lists. Next we click Update on the Hill Chart and drag the dots for those lists into position.


Now anybody who checks on the project can see the status of these three lists. Two of them are over the hill — full of certainty, with just execution left. One is still on the uphill slope, which means there are unsolved problems or open questions.

Note how that the status is human generated, not computer generated. This reflects a real person’s feeling of the work at this moment. And because the status is attached to lists, not individual to-do items, we gain a higher-order perspective on all the work at once.

Hills make history

Every time someone updates the positions on the hill, a new snapshot is saved to the project’s history. This enables managers to immediately acquire a ton of context about what is moving on the project and what isn’t without peppering the team with questions. People on the team can optionally annotate each of their updates with commentary. You can even comment on or Boost someone else’s Hill Chart update. This enables a new level of fast, asynchronous communication about high-level progress on projects.


More well-defined work

Sometimes trying to position a list on the Hill Chart helps you to better structure the work. On a recent project we were building a feature to notify people when an Event in Basecamp was rescheduled.

This dot didn’t move for a few days.

That dot sat there for a few days without moving. Something was wrong. Why weren’t we making progress? After a short talk with the team, we realized that it was unclear where to place the dot because part of the work was fully figured out and part wasn’t. The back-end code to deliver the notification was fully solved. But there was some more design work relating to the emails and Hey! menu that we hadn’t figured out. So where should the dot go?

In a case like this, the hill is telling us to break up the list. We renamed the original list to “Notification: Delivery” and moved it over the hill to show where it really stood. Then we created two separate lists to track the front-end work that was still uphill.

Breaking up the work shows where it really stands

Redefining the To-Do Lists like this made it easier to see what was actually going on in the project and what needed to be done next.

Flexible, per-list setting

For each project, you can choose which To-Do Lists appear as dots on the Hill Chart. It’s a per-list setting, so you can still have regular To-Do Lists mixed in with your tracked lists. We usually keep a list called “Chowder” at the end a project for loose ends that don’t fit anywhere else, and we don’t plot that one on the hill.

From unknown to known, and known to done

Instead of counting tasks, the Hill Chart shows where the work really stands. From unknown on the far left, to known at the top, to done on the far right.

Since we adopted the Hill Chart internally at Basecamp, our teams have been communicating about progress at a level never before possible. Our intuitions are the same, but now we have a visual way to immediately show each other where the work stands. And because of the Hill Chart history, we don’t need to call meetings to catch up on a project’s status. It’s no longer a challenge to see what’s in motion and what’s stuck. We can have quick, substantial conversations asynchronously about where to focus next or how to break up a problem.

That’s the kind of thing Basecamp is supposed to do: make you more organized, give you more time, and put everybody on the same page.

We hope you can experience the same benefits we have by trying the Hill Chart on your next Basecamp 3 project. You can use the Hill Chart on any project today by navigating to a particular To-Do List and choosing “Track this on the Hill Chart” from the Options menu (•••) in the top-right corner.


New to Basecamp? Learn what it’s all about and start a 30-day free trial over at Basecamp.com.

Protect your Basecamp login with Google’s two-factor authentication

Using SMS as a second security factor for signing into web applications is no longer recommended by security experts. Therefore we will be ending our homegrown SMS verification program on July 2nd, 2018, and switching to Google’s state-of-the-art Two-Factor Authentication (2FA) system.

Moving forward, if you want to secure your Basecamp account with 2FA, you’ll need to log into Basecamp using a Google Sign-In. You can use Google Sign-In with 2FA through their own authentication app, 1Password (we love those guys!), or the gold standard of a physical Yubikey.

How to switch to Google Sign-in with 2FA for Basecamp:

It’s never been more important to take serious precautions to guard your security online. Hacks are common, and failing to protect your online accounts with a second factor makes it so much easier to become a victim. We highly recommend switching to a Google Sign-In so you can take advantage of the protections 2FA provides.

Besides Basecamp, please take the time to get acquainted with two-factor authentication in general, and ensure that you have it turned on for as many services as you can. These days, almost everyone offers some way of adding a second factor. Read about doing it for iCloud, Dropbox, GitHub, Facebook, and Twitter.

Good security is like good backups. It’s a bit of a hassle to setup, but the regret you’ll feel if you don’t have it when you need it dwarfs that inconvenience. Don’t procrastinate.

Heyyy … Improved Hey! in Basecamp 3 for Android

Ping and Message excerpts, image previews, and grouped Campfires make catching up with Basecamp a breeze.

There’s a new Hey! screen design in Basecamp 3 for Android. Hey! is already pretty good on Desktop and Web. Currently you get a chronological list of unread Campfires you’re following and discussions you’re part of.

On Mobile, however, you’re probably peeking in for a quick summary of What’s New. Hey! should help you prioritize what’s important at that moment. A better design can save time.

Here’s how the current Android Hey! and this new design compare:

The new design (right) makes Hey! easier to parse and prioritize.

✨ What We Improved

  1. Show me my Pings. Excerpts from unread Ping conversations are now shown at the top of the Hey! screen. If you have more than one unread Ping conversation they’ll be grouped together. You’ll see all your new Pings in one place. Note: All Pings are still accessible everywhere in the app via the top navigation. Just tap the “conversation bubbles” icon next to Search.
  2. Group unread Campfires together. New chats from Campfires you follow are now easily scanned since they’re grouped together. The Campfire notification will also display who spoke last (which matches Basecamp 3 on the Desktop and Web).
  3. Give context to Messages, Comments, and more. It’s a mystery what’s behind that unread notification. It might be 1 sentence, or 1 emoji, or a long paragraph. Now there’s an excerpt of text and image thumbnails so you can see what was posted without having to tap through.

💅 The Result: Better Insight into What’s New

Messages and Comments are no longer a mystery. Excerpts and image previews hint whether you should dive deeper or move along. Unread Campfires aren’t scattered across other notifications. You can prioritize chats you want to read.

The new design gives Hey! notifications more context. It helps you stay looped into Basecamp without having to tap each notification. Stay updated at your own pace.

🖼 Bonus: Swipe Through Multiple Images

We also updated our image viewer to know if a Message or Comment has multiple images. Now you can swipe back and forth between images! If there’s a caption we show that too.


We hope you like these improvements to the Basecamp 3 Android app (Version 3.9.1, updated May 1, 2018). We have a lot more planned and thanks for being a Basecamp customer—especially if you have an Android device!

Thanks for reading. If you have any questions about Basecamp 3 for Android please let us know.

— Brought to you by the Android Team at Basecamp: Jamie, Dan, and Jay

Introducing Boosts: an all-new way to show your support in Basecamp

We gave up on Likes and invented a totally new form of tiny communication.

If there’s one thing you can’t avoid on the Internet, it’s Likes. They’re in nearly every software platform where people post photos or write text messages.


Sometimes Likes are called Faves, Hearts, Reactions, Claps, or something else, but the basic idea is the same: they’re a small, quick way to express your feelings about something, usually accompanied by a count of other people who had that same feeling.

Until today, we had exactly this sort of feature in Basecamp 3. We called it Applause. If you liked a post, you’d clap for it. Everyone who clapped was shown in a row.

Basecamp’s applause feature.

This was fine, of course—it worked just like all the other Likes.

But a couple months ago, we started thinking more deeply about this pattern, and we noticed it has a lot of insidious problems.

  1. Likes are vague, especially in a professional setting. Let’s say your boss liked someone else’s post, and not yours. You might start questioning what happened. Was she just busy and not paying full attention to everything? Or did she do that intentionally? What does it all mean!? There’s no way to know, because there’s not enough information — just a bunch of digital grunting.
  2. Likes are obligatory. How many times have you felt obligated to SMASH THE LIKE BUTTON because you didn’t want to seem like a jerk, or because everyone else was liking something? There’s a subtle peer pressure and herd mentality hiding behind those thumbs up.
  3. Likes are vanity metrics. Whenever you post something to a social network, do you obsessively check to see how it was received? That’s because those little Like counts are a drug for your brain: you get a dopamine rush by observing your own mini-popularity contest. It’s a psychological trick to keep you coming back for more.
  4. Likes are thoughtless. Has there ever been a more mindless form of communication than merely tapping a button? Liking something requires almost no effort or consideration whatsoever. Here’s what you’re really saying: “Thank you for spending your precious time posting this. In return, I have clicked a button. It took me less than one second. Bye.”
  5. Likes are canned. In most apps you have to pick from a predefined set of acceptable symbols (or in Basecamp’s case, just clapping.) That’s not great for addressing the infinite range of nuanced human emotions, and it’s also totally impersonal. Why should some software company decide which 3 emotions you’re allowed to have?

Now, it’s not all bad. There are some good things about Likes too:

  1. Sharing support for others is wonderful. We want to encourage that, of course!
  2. It’s nice to respond to something without making a fuss. You might not have much to say, but you still want to let someone know you appreciated their ideas. Notifying a bunch of other people on a thread merely to say “good job!” is overkill.
  3. It’s helpful to know that people saw your posts. When you see that 10 people liked your post, you’ll know they received it and thought about it (at least a little.)

With all of these ideas in mind, we went back to the drawing board and came up with a fresh new approach that’s never been done before. We’re calling it Boosts, and it’s way better than all of those crummy digital grunts.

Here’s how you boost something in Basecamp.

In various places in Basecamp, you’ll see a new rocket icon:

Boost button!

Click that, and it’ll morph into a small text field.

A field in which to boost

You’ll notice there are no predetermined options or smiley face buttons to choose from. That’s on purpose. You have to make it up yourself!

Add some emoji or write a tiny text note, up to 16 characters max. Then click the green check mark to save your boost (or the red X to cancel.)

You can add more than one boost if you want, and they’ll collect into a little bundle like so:

Boosting twice

Your boosts won’t notify anyone other than the original poster. So if you’re on a comment thread with 10 other people and you boost Dave, only Dave will get a notification about it. This is in contrast to comments, which send a notification to everyone on the thread. So if you just want to say “Great job!” or “I agree” or “👍”, but you don’t want to bug everyone with a notification, boosts are best!

If you messed up making a boost, click on it and a trash icon will appear. Click the trash to delete it. (If you’re an admin, you can delete anyone’s boosts in the same way.)

Deleting a boost

After a lot of people have boosted someone, you’ll see a sweet block of small supportive comments, where everyone’s message is totally unique! There are no vanity counts or anything like that.

Here’s how it looked when I announced that we’d be launching Boosts:

A block o’ boosts

Other times, boosts work like a silly mini-conversation.

lol juice boosts

When you’ve received some boosts, you’ll get notified about them every 3 hours as long as there’s something new to report—otherwise Basecamp won’t notify you.


Why every 3 hours? We think it’s the perfect amount of time: infrequent enough that you won’t be bombarded about little responses, but frequent enough that you won’t miss anything for too long.

When you click on that notification, you’ll see all your boosts, ordered by date:


You can also unsubscribe from the boosts notifications, if you prefer. Just hit the button in the top-right corner of the page above.


What happened to applause?

Applause is no more (it’s been replaced by Boosts.) But old posts that had applause will still show it—those claps have simply been turned into boosts instead.

Clap Boosts.

So that’s Boosts — we hope you like them! (Pun intended)

We’ve been using boosts for over a month, and we’ve found them to be a much richer form of communication than our primitive old applause system. They’re far more contextual, freeform, and creative: perfect for posting short, thoughtful responses.

After a few days, you’ll notice you won’t feel obligated to boost something unless you genuinely have something to say. Boosts are far less susceptible to vague interpretations, since every little boost is unique to the conversation at hand. And with no buttons to smash, there’s no more mindless button smashing!

Give boosts a try and let us know what you think. We’d love to hear from you on Twitter or in the comments on this post.

🚀🚀🚀


New to Basecamp and want to see what it’s all about? Sign up for a 30 day free trial over yonder.

Highrise is back with Basecamp

Welcome home!

In 2014, Highrise was spun off as a separate (but wholly-owned) company from Basecamp. Last year it celebrated its tenth anniversary in business. And this year it’s moving back in with Basecamp.

In some ways, it’s like it never left. While Highrise operated as an independent company under Nathan Kontny as CEO, Basecamp’s technical operations team continued to run servers and systems. Our support team still has a lot of people who used to answer customers when Highrise was a direct part of our suite of products. And almost all the members of the original product team for Highrise are still with Basecamp.

In other ways, this is indeed a change. Nathan Kontny had built a team of seven to lead new development, and they made a lot of improvements over the years. We want to thank the team for all their work and wish them all the very best.

Spinning Highrise off into a separate company with a separate team and CEO was always a bit of an experiment. While that experiment had a bunch of highlights, we ultimate decided it was time to try something different on both the product and business side after a thorough review was conducted some time ago.

For customers of Highrise, we at Basecamp are committed to supporting the product until the end of the internet! Highrise is home to over 10,000 customers who’ve trusted their data and their business to us. We are grateful for the trust and will continue to operate Highrise to the same high standards as Basecamp.

In short, this transition back to the Basecamp team is going to be nearly invisible to Highrise customers. Highrise is returning to the team that originally built the software, and it’s being operated on the technical side by the same team that always did so.

We’ve also begun exploring a range of new directions for the product’s future. We’re not yet ready to share where this is going, but will do so as soon as there’s a final path set.

Thank you to all our Highrise customers whether you’ve been with us for 10 days or 10 years! ❤️

– Jason & David

What’s New in Basecamp 3.9 for iOS

This release is all about usability improvements. Download it for iPhone and iPad from the App Store now.

Find tab improvements 🔍

The Find tab now lets you quickly jump to anything you recently viewed without having to type a word! When you open Find, you’ll see your most recently visited pages, making it super easy to quickly get back to something you were viewing. Or start typing to instantly search in place for anything in your Basecamp account. You can also use advanced filters to define even more specific search terms. Go forth and find!


New project and team pages ⚡️

The old project and team pages were… slow. We decided to speed them up, as well as feature your team’s latest activity more prominently with this new design. Instead of nearly identical cards for each tool, you’ll see a unique icon in a bright color, making them easier to recognize. Each icon also has a bit of data underneath, hinting at what’s in each tool so far. We’ve been testing these internally for quite a while and the increased speed has been such a relief. We hope you love it too.


Improved image viewing in Activity 📷

Image previews in the activity feed are now much larger and easier to interact with. If there are multiple images in an attachment, we’ll group them together in a nice grid, too! You can tap on any photo to view it in the media viewer right from the activity feed, or tap into the thread if you want more details and context.


Simplified navigation and tool indexes 🗺

The nav bar now just displays the project or team name, as well as a button to launch the menu to jump to another tool. The screen’s title is displayed larger, and there’s a big “add something” button on every screen so you can’t miss it! We experimented with a lot of complicated designs for this and ended up going with the simplest option. Sometimes you need to overthink to realize you’re overthinking, I think. Now I’m overthinking this.


New UI for uploading attachments 📎

You’ll now have more room to access additional options when uploading individual attachments to Docs & Files, like sketching, adding notes to your upload, or changing the file name. Cool!


Support for clients in projects 💼

All new clients in projects features will work on iOS right out of the gate! Read more about this entirely new way to work with clients in Basecamp over here.


And you know, “bug fixes and performance improvements….” 🐛

  • Scrolling within a field while you’re writing is much smoother now. “Less janky,” you might say.
  • Updated theme choices, so you can pick from a lighter or darker version of each theme color.
  • Fixed some drag and drop issues!
  • Fixed missing file-type icons for non-media attachments in Activity.
  • And various other bug fixes that are boring to explain.

Thanks for reading and feel free to reach out with any comments, suggestions, concerns, feedback, bugs, doughnut recommendations, etc.

😎 Team iOS, 
Jason Zimdars, Zach Waugh, Dylan Ginsburg, and myself.

Launch: A brand new way to work with clients in Basecamp 3

When we launched Basecamp 3, we introduced a new way for client services firms to work with their clients. We called it the Clientside. It was an entirely separate part of a Basecamp project where all client-facing communications lived. Essentially, it was a mini project within a project — a distinct space with separate tools and a different interface.

Conceptually it made sense, but practically it was inflexible and not collaborative enough. It worked well for some people, but it missed the mark for far more. We fell short of what we hoped we’d be able to create.

So we put our heads together and spent a couple months working on a complete revamp. Today we’re introducing something better.

Introducing Clients in Basecamp!

Starting today, not only can you send messages to clients, but now you can work with clients using all the same tools you already use with your team. That means you can assign clients to-dos, share files and folders, schedule events and meetings, chat around the Campfire, and even ask clients automatic check-in questions! If you can do it with your team, you can do it with your clients. And now it all happens in the same place as the rest of the project — no more separate Clientside. It’s everything you’ve been asking for.

You’re in 100% control of what clients see. Clarity and privacy is at the core of this new feature. That’s why everything in a project is now labeled as “private to our team” or “the client can see this”. Plus, to reduce anxiety and prevent “oh shit, they weren’t supposed to see that” moments, everything in a project starts off as private just to your team. When you’re ready to share something — a message, a to-do, a file — just flip the switch:



Whenever you post something new, you’ll have the option to specify if the client should be able to see it or if it’s private just to your team:

Blue+lock means private to your team, yellow+eye means visible to the client.

For example, here’s a to-do on a to-do list the client can see. It’s also assigned to Victor, your client:


And here’s a message thread about a revised headshot. The client can see it, and they’ve responded below:


And here’s an email you’ve forwarded in that you don’t want the client to see. It’s been marked private for your team only:


And finally, here’s a combination of files and folders. The client can see some folders, but not others. For clarity, only the ones they can see are labeled with the “The client sees this” tag:

They can’t see the “logo redesign folder” in top left, but they can see everything else.

Log-in or email-only — It Just Works!

We all know how hard it can be to ask a client to get used to using a new system. Even an easy system like Basecamp 3. So, Basecamp works even if your clients don’t want to learn anything new. Clients can respond to Basecamp messages right from their inbox, and new email they send you can be forwarded to Basecamp where your whole team can see them. Regardless if whether a client logs in and posts something directly to Basecamp, or they respond to a message via email, you’ll always have everything in one organized place inside the Basecamp project.

Fantastic! How do we turn it on?

  1. Go into a project, click the “Add/remove people” button. This is the same way you’d invite anyone to a project:


2. Then click the green “Add people” button and select “Invite a client to the project” from the bottom of the menu.


Now you’re off and running. Any existing content will be private, and anything new you add to the project will give you the option to mark something as private or visible to the client.

Back to the future?

If you’ve used Basecamp Classic or Basecamp 2, this new setup may ring a bell. You’d be right — it’s based on a similar approach. What’s changed is both the interface and the default privacy setting. In Classic and 2, everything in a project was visible to a client until you marked it private. Problem with that was that you could easily make a mistake and reveal something you didn’t intend to. But then it was too late. That’s why in Basecamp 3 we’ve flipped it. Everything is private by default. You have to expressly give a client permission to see something. It’s much safer this way. Less anxiety ahead.

What if we liked the Clientside?

If you’re an existing customer that used the Clientside in the past, you can continue to use it on any project in your account. It’s no longer an option for new customers, or for existing customers who’ve never used the Clientside before, but if you have, and you still prefer it, it’s all yours. You can even use the Clientside on existing projects and the new way on new projects. Further, if you relied heavily on the Approvals feature, you’ll want to continue to use the Clientside as there’s currently no equivalent feature outside the Clientside.


This is a big change, a big deal. We think you’re really going to like it. You’ll have the power and flexibility to collaborate with clients in true Basecamp style without any of the limitations imposed by the previous Clientside approach. And most importantly, you’ll always have 100% control over what messages, to-do lists, folders, files, Campfire chat, and automatic check-ins your clients can see and participate in. This way you can keep the private work private, and the shared work visible — all in the same project so everything is organized together.

Questions? Comments? Post ’em below. Thanks again for using Basecamp 3!

New in Basecamp 3: Get notified when someone reschedules events & to-dos

Stay in the loop when dates change

Last month, we added to-dos to the redesigned Schedule Card in Basecamp 3. This made it much easier to see what’s coming up on your projects.

But dates slip — due dates are shifted, events get moved—and Basecamp didn’t make it easy to see changes to your schedule. Starting today, whenever a to-do you’re assigned or an event you’re participating in is rescheduled, we’ll tell you about it.

Here’s how it works

Before, you’d only receive a notification when you were added to an event in Basecamp 3. Now, you’ll see a separate notification if that event gets rescheduled to a different date or time:

An event as added and then rescheduled

To-dos work a similar way. You’ll see notifications whenever due dates are added or shifted on your assignments:

Due date added and Due date changed notifications

Who will receive these notifications?

At Basecamp, we’re not huge fans of interruptions. To keep the noise down, we’ll only send these notifications to:

  • People assigned to the to-do
  • The person who made the assignment
  • Event participants

Other subscribers will not be notified of date changes. That means you can comment on an event or to-do without being inundated with notifications.

What if I reschedule something multiple times?

In another effort to avoid notification overload, we’ve grouped things together:

  • Hey! Menu: Hey! notifications are bundled for each item, so you won’t see 3 separate entries if your manager rescheduled that to-do or event 3 times in rapid succession.
  • Emails: For folks who prefer email, we’ll aggregate to-do due date changes into a single message. So if a manager sets due dates for several tasks, you’ll receive just one email about it:

A single email for recent to-do due date changes

We hope this makes it easier to keep track of upcoming events and due dates in Basecamp 3. We’re working hard on more improvements in the coming weeks. Stay tuned!


Got feedback or ideas to share? We’d love to hear what you think about the new features. You can contact us on Twitter or share your thoughts via our Support form.

New in Basecamp: Improved Schedule Cards

A more complete picture of what’s coming up

This was a classic case of “How hard could it be?” that started as a series of customer requests and bug reports. People wanted to see their events AND their dated to-dos on their Basecamp 3 Schedule cards. Totally reasonable, right? Like anything involving dates, timezones, and computers, it took more than a little wrangling… But now you can!

Let There Be To-dos
Here’s a great example from our Ops Team. Before, we only showed upcoming schedule events. That triggered a misleading message that said “Nothing’s coming up!”

Nothing’s coming up! Maybe?

Why is this misleading? If you click through to the Schedule itself, you’ll see there’s actually a to-do due tomorrow:

Surpise!

You wouldn’t have known that glancing at the Schedule card. With the changes we just added, you’ll now see something like this when you’ve got upcoming to-dos:

Voila! Just like the full Schedule

Who and When?
Another thing was missing from the previous design: It wasn’t clear exactly who was involved in an event and precisely when it was happening. That’s because we just showed the name of the event and the date on which it occurred:

What time is dinner, anyway?

Now, we show avatars for each participant and to-do assignee as well as times for events that happen at a specific time:

A lovely group and an early start.

Templates
Project Templates were also missing to-dos. That led to situations like this where the Schedule looked blank:

Nohting to see here… Or is there?

In fact, there may have been several to-dos:

The full picture

We hope this makes Schedule cards more useful for you. Stay tuned for more updates to Basecamp 3!


Got feedback or ideas to share? We’d love to hear what you think about the new features. You can contact us on Twitter or share your thoughts via our Support form.