Running spot instances effectively with Amazon EKS

Since we started working on HEY, one of the things that I’ve been a big proponent of was keeping as much of the app-side compute infrastructure on spot instances as possible (front-end and async job processing; excluding the database, Redis, and Elasticsearch). Coming out of our first two weeks running the app with a real production traffic load, we’re sitting at ~90% of our compute running on spot instances.

Especially around the launch of a new product, you typically don’t know what traffic and load levels are going to look like, making purchases of reserved instances or savings plans a risky proposition. Spot instances give us the ability to get the compute we need at an even deeper discount than a 1-year RI or savings plan rate would, without the same commitment. Combine the price with seamless integration with auto-scaling groups and it makes them a no-brainer for most of our workloads.

The big catch with spot instances? AWS can take them back from you with a two-minute notice.

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Seamless branch deploys with Kubernetes

Basecamp’s newest product HEY has lived on Kubernetes since development first began. While our applications are majestic monoliths, a product like HEY has numerous supporting services that run along-side the main app like our mail pipeline (Postfix and friends), Resque (and Resque Scheduler), and nginx, making Kubernetes a great orchestration option for us.

As you work on code changes or new feature additions for an application, you naturally want to test them somewhere — either in a unique environment or in production via feature flags. For our other applications like Basecamp 3, we make this happen via a series of numbered environments called betas (beta1 through betaX). A beta environment is essentially a mini production environment — it uses the production database but everything else (app services, Resque, Redis) is separate. In Basecamp 3’s case, we have a claim system via an internal chatbot that shows the status of each beta environment (here, none of them are claimed):

(prior to starting work on HEY, we were running 8 beta environments for BC3)

Our existing beta setup is fine, but what if we can do something better with the new capabilities that we are afforded by relying on Kubernetes? Indeed we can! After reading about GitHub’s branch-lab setup, I was inspired to come up with a better solution for beta environments than our existing claims system. The result is what’s in-use today for HEY: a system that (almost) immediately deploys any branch to a branch-specific endpoint that you can access right away to test your changes without having to use the claims system or talk to anyone else (along with an independent job processing fleet and Redis instance to support the environment).

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